Red Cross volunteers in Bridgeport get ready to head south

Red Cross volunteers in Bridgeport get ready to head south

Tropical Storm Michael Spreads Flooding Rain, Wind Into Carolinas, East After Historic Category 4 Florida Panh

Hurricane Michael makes landfall in the Florida Panhandle region; the mayor of Apalachicola discusses assessing the damage on Your World.

At least one person in Florida was killed by a fallen tree during Hurricane Michael on Wednesday, according to local officials.

A spokeswoman for the Gadsden County Sheriff's Office told Fox News that the office received a report that an unidentified man in the Panhandle became trapped after a fallen tree ripped through his home's roof.

– Total rainfall of 4 to 7 inches is expected from the Carolinas and southern Virginia to the southern Delmarva Peninsula, with isolated totals up to 9 inches in North Carolina and Virginia. This will include some areas devastated by flooding from Hurricane Florence. That said, this system will move quickly rather than stall like Florence did and will, therefore, not bring extreme rainfall amounts. – The rest of the Northeast coast into southeast New England may see 1 to 3 inches of rain.

Michael claims second life, a child in mobile home, on its way to Carolinas

Hurricane Michael made landfall shortly before 2 p.m. ET northwest of Mexico Beach and just outside Panama City, National Hurricane Center (NHC) Director Ken Graham told Fox News’ Shepard Smith.

– Florida: 5.26 inches at Sumatra; 3.17 inches in Tallahassee; 2.61 inches in Panama City- Alabama: 5.54 inches in Ozark; 4.92 inches in Dothan; 1.60 inches in Montgomery- Georgia: 6.48 inches near Powder Springs; 3.37 inches in Macon- South Carolina: 6.01 inches near Hartsville; 4.47 inches in Columbia- North Carolina: 9.62 inches near Black Mountain; 6.75 inches near Boone; 2.95 inches in Asheville- Virginia: 5.75 inches near White Gate; 1.40 inches in Blacksburg

A woman checks on her vehicle as Hurricane Michael passes through, after the hotel canopy had just collapsed, in Panama City Beach on Wednesday.

Michael was the third most intense continental U.S. landfall by pressure and fourth strongest by maximum sustained winds on record. Michael was also the most intense Florida Panhandle landfall on record, the first Category 4 hurricane to do so in records dating to the mid-19th century.

Since then, the storm has pushed inland over the Panhandle, and the eye is currently coursing through southwestern Georgia, according to an 11 p.m. advisory from the NHC.

Michael arrived in southwestern Georgia early Wednesday evening as a Category 3 major hurricane, the first hurricane of that strength to track into Georgia since the Georgia Hurricane of 1898, according to Dr. Phil Klotzbach, tropical scientist at Colorado State University.

The hurricane, which made landfall as a Category 4 storm, was downgraded to a Category 1 with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph and is moving northeast at 20 mph, the agency said. "Damaging winds" continued to blow through parts of Florida and Georgia, while flooding remained a threat.

A weather reporting station deployed by Weatherflow and the University of Florida measured a surface pressure from 920-929 millibars, an extraordinarily low pressure to measure on U.S. soil, before it was toppled, according to Shea Gibson, WeatherFlow, Inc. meteorologist.

"On the forecast track, the core of Michael will move across southwestern and central Georgia tonight, and move through east-central Georgia Thursday morning," the advisory said. "Michael will then move northeastward across the southeastern United States through late Thursday, and then move off the Mid-Atlantic coast by early Friday."

Winds gusted to 50-55 mph, at times, in Augusta, Georgia, Charleston and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Thursday morning. There have been a number of reports of trees and power lines downed in eastern Georgia and South Carolina, including in the Columbia metro area.

Fox News Chief Meteorologist Rick Reichmuth said Michael was the fourth most powerful hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S. in terms of wind, which clocked in at 155 mph, and the third most powerful in terms of pressure, at 919 mb.

The National Hurricane Center's Storm Surge Unit, estimated peak storm surge inundation of 9 to 14 feet above ground likely occurred from Mexico Beach through Apalachee Bay, a location notorious for storm surge even from less intense tropical cyclones. 

More than 375,000 people up and down the Gulf Coast were warned to evacuate, and the hurricane's leading edge sent storm surge into neighborhoods as it approached.

As Michael neared, heavy waves pounded the shoreline in Panama City Beach, which caused a building under construction to collapse.

In nearby Apalachicola, storm surge sent water pouring into city neighborhoods and covering roadways.

Michael's storm surge produced a peak inundation of 7.72 feet above ground level at Apalachicola, Florida, Wednesday afternoon, smashing the previous record of 6.43 feet above ground set during Hurricane Dennis in July 2005. 

The Walton County Sheriff's Office shared a photo on Twitter of a boat getting rocked in the waves and urged extreme caution to residents, warning them "not" to "take any chances" during the "unforgiving" hurricane.

Florida officials also pleaded with residents to stay off the roads as crews tried to clear debris and emergency workers were scrambling to hard-hit areas. They asked people to avoid downed power lines, and not to drive through flooded areas. They urged residents and visitors to keep emergency phone lines open and, in some areas, to boil their water or use bottled water. They told them to position generators at least 15 feet from homes, and to stay indoors.

"Michael is upon us, it is time to seek refuge. Once you are sheltered, STAY PUT," Scott tweeted. "Do not try to leave until the storm has passed. Multiple state and federal resources are staged and ready to respond as soon as it is safe.

After the storm made landfall, Scott requested that President Trump issue a Major Disaster Declaration for Florida. Trump on Tuesday approved a pre-landfall emergency declaration.

The hospital was in poor condition to take in patients. Staff members said the hospital had partial electricity from its generators; there was no water and the toilets were filling up. Windows were broken. One staff member said that the fourth floor was flooded — perhaps from leaky windows or roof damage, she wasnt sure. She had tied plastic bags over her shoes and the legs of her scrubs.

The governor also tweeted photos of supplies ready to be disbursed to those affected by Hurricane Michael.

PANAMA CITY, Fla. — Emergency officials rushed to evacuate at least 200 patients from a heavily damaged hospital and a vast search-and-rescue operation took shape across the Florida Panhandle on Thursday, one day after Hurricane Michaels bombardment left homes splintered to their foundations, roads and water systems compromised and hundreds of thousands of people without electricity.

More than 366,000 accounts in Florida were without power as a result of the storm, according to a report tweeted by the state's Division of Emergency Management. Scott wrote that utility company personnel was at the ready and restoring power was "a top priority."

Bay Medical Center Sacred Heart, a 300-bed hospital in the heart of Panama City, Fla., was a tumultuous mess on Thursday morning. Hurricane Michael had strafed the center, breaking windows, damaging roofs and stripping off the outsides of some buildings. Signage was strewn in the streets. Doctors, nurses and staff members wandered outside, some crying, some looking for cell service.

"Utility companies have nearly 19,000 personnel staged to begin power restoration," he tweeted. "Getting power back on is absolutely critical to our recovery and response efforts- this is a top priority."

• At 11 a.m. on Thursday, Michael was about 35 miles south-southeast of Charlotte, N.C., heading northeast with sustained wind speeds of up to 50 miles per hour. The storm is moving relatively quickly, at 23 m.p.h., and is expected to speed up as it crosses the Carolinas on Thursday and blows out to sea by early Friday. Click on the map below to see the storms projected path.

The National Weather Service (NWS) also urged residents to avoid the temptation to "explore the damage done by #Michael."

The base, which sits just nine feet above sea level, is home to a series of hangers and a runway, as well as tree-lined neighborhoods for about 600 Air Force personnel. The base hosts a number of jets, including F-22 Raptor stealth fighters, which cost well over $100 million a piece. The base commander ordered all jets to fly to inland bases earlier in the week.

"Winds might be calming down and the rain stoopping, but significant danger remains," the tweet said. "Downed power lines can kill."

Diane Farris, 57, and her son joined about 1,100 people crammed into a shelter in Panama City meant for about half as many. Neither she nor her son had any way to communicate because their lone cellphone got wet and quit working, according to the Associated Press.

• Much of the coast of the Florida Panhandle, including Panama City, Fla., and Mexico Beach, near where the hurricane made landfall, was left in ruins. Images from there showed swaths of shattered debris where houses once stood and structures inundated up to their rooftops; streets were blocked by downed tree limbs and impossible tangles of power lines.

"I'm worried about my daughter and grandbaby. I don't know where they are. You know, that's hard," she told the AP.

As the storm intersects the track that Hurricane Florence took last month, Michael is expected to drop one to four inches of rain on still-saturated ground. Several areas are under flash-flood warnings. Unlike Florence, this storms rapid motion is expected to limit the long and drenching rainfall that inundated the Carolinas coastal plain.

More than 5,000 evacuees sought shelter in Tallahassee, which is about 25 miles from the coast but is covered by live oak and pine trees that can fall and cause power outages even in smaller storms.

Emily Hindle lies on the floor at an evacuation shelter set up at Rutherford High School, in advance of Hurricane Michael. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

High winds led to the death of an 11-year-old girl in Seminole County, Georgia, EMA Director Travis Brooks told The Washington Post early Thursday morning. The girl had been inside a trailer home in an unincorporated area of the county near Lake Seminole, close to the Florida-Georgia border. From what officials could determine, Brooks said, it looked like a metal carport used to store boats had been lifted in the air by the gusting winds and had flipped over. When it landed, its legs crashed through the roof of a neighboring mobile home and hit the girl in the head.

Tyndall Air Force base, situated on a peninsula just south of Panama City, "took a direct hit from Hurricane Michael" and "sustained extensive damage," a Facebook post from the base said. No injuries were reported.

The home of the 325th Fighter Wing and some 600 military families appeared squarely targeted for the worst of the storm's fury, and leaders declared HURCON 1 status, ordering out all but essential personnel. The base's aircraft, which include F-22 Raptors, were flown hundreds of miles away as a precaution. Forecasters predicted 9 to 14 feet of water at Tyndall. The evacuation order was to continue "until further notice," the base said.

The strength of Hurricane Michael tore off building roofs, downed trees and powerlines and "caused significant structural damage," the base said, adding that it was immediately clear what condition the runway was in.

A car is seen in a parking lot while flooding begins as Hurricane Michael approaches on October 10, 2018 in Panama City, Florida. – Hurricane Michael closed in on Floridas Gulf Coast on Wednesday as an “extremely dangerous” category four storm packing powerful winds and a huge sea surge, US forecasters said. The Miami-based National Hurricane Center said the storm, which local forecasters are calling an “unprecedented” weather event for the area, is expected to slam ashore later in the day with “life-threatening” storm surges.

Evacuations spanned 22 counties from the Panhandle into north-central Florida. But civilians don't have to follow orders, and authorities feared that many people ignored the warnings to get out.

High-rise buildings in Panama City Beach, Florida, built to withstand high winds; Jeff Flock reports from the ground on the conditions.

"We've told those who stayed to have their life jackets on when the storm comes," Tress Dameron, Franklin County emergency management coordinator, told The News Herald in Panama City.

Meanwhile, Trump was briefed on Hurricane Michael as it closed in on the Florida Panhandle, and was warned of the power of the storm as he meets with his Homeland Security Secretary and the Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Brock Long.

The storms center is currently about 30 miles west of Augusta, Georgia, near the South Carolina border. Forecasters expect that Michael will continue to weaken Thursday as the storm travels over land, likely reaching central South Carolina Thursday morning. Once Michael reaches the Atlantic, the storm is expected to intensify again as it becomes a post-tropical low.

Long described storm as a "Gulf Coast hurricane of the worst kind," which he said will be similar in strength to "an EF3 tornado making landfall."

The first confirmed fatality of the storm was recorded Wednesday. The Gadsden County Sheriffs office said that a man was found dead in his home in a small town outside of Tallahassee after a tree crashed through the roof. Sgt. Angela Hightower did not identify the man but said he had been found at the home in Greensboro around 6 p.m.

Trump said he spoke with Scott on Tuesday and says the federal government is coordinating with all of the states that could be impacted.

Reporter Peyton LoCicero went on Periscope, an app that allows people to live stream to a public audience from a cellphone, to give updates about the storm. She spoke from the parking lot of a wrecked gas station in Walton County, tilting the camera to show the damage around her. The stations awning had crashed to the ground.

.Hotel employees look at a canopy that just collapsed, as Hurricane Michael passes through in Panama City Beach (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Images of the destruction in coastal Florida towns circulated widely Wednesday night, shocking even seasoned storm chasers and weather watchers. Franklin County Sheriff A.J Smith told CNN that the county was nearly isolated after most of the main roads were rendered impassable from flooding and downed trees.

After lashing the coast of Florida, rainfall up to 12 inches is possible and may cause flash-flooding inland, the NHC said. But unlike Hurricane Florence, Michael will accelerate Wednesday night and Thursday, preventing any long-term flooding from rainfall, according to Fox News Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean.

"The Carolinas will, unfortunately, get more rain on top of the flooding damage they had with Hurricane Florence," she said.

Isolated tornadoes are also possible from North Florida through Georgia and southern South Carolina as the storm continues its path.

The National Weather Service's office on Twitter issued a tornado watch until 2 a.m. ET for areas in both Florida and Georgia.

Fox News Lucas Tomlinson, Nicole Darrah, Lacy Heather, Stephen Sorace and The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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