Ontario First Nations fight for cannabis rights

Ontario First Nations fight for cannabis rights

THC-infused genital spray mislabelled as oral product at Ontario Cannabis Store

The Fleur de Lune Intimate Spray was initially mislabelled on the Ontario Cannabis Store website. (OCS)

TORONTO — A perusal of the Ontario Cannabis Stores online portal on the first day of legalization turned up an array of expected products — various strains of dried weed, oils and tinctures, and accessories needed to use them.

“It’s a product like many that are used today for intimate areas of the body, but it should be labelled as such … obviously there’s a mistake there that needs to be corrected, so we certainly will be following up with them to ensure that the right information is being given to consumers.” (The error appeared to be fixed as of 7 p.m. ET)

Ontario Cannabis Store mislabels genital spray as oral product

But also on offer is a cannabis-infused "intimate" spray, marketed under the enticingly named Fleur de Lune, which contains eight milligrams of the psychoactive ingredient THC, as well as the cannabinoid CBD.

The only problem is that the Ontario Cannabis Store had initially mislabelled how to apply the product, saying it was for "sublingual" use, which means under the tongue — in other words, orally.

“So there is no one dose that’s right for any one particular person … Everybody responds to cannabis in a different way, and it may be because genetically you respond differently. It may be because you haven’t used cannabis before, so you have a different tolerance level.”

In fact, the spray made by Hexo Corp. is meant to be applied on the genitals, "particularly for women," to reduce such symptoms as inflammation and pain, said Terry Lake, the Quebec-based companys vice-president of corporate social responsibility.

Day one mess up: Ontario Cannabis Store mislabels $82 genital spray as oral product

"We always knew there was going to be bumps along the road, no country has done this to this extent," Lake said of Canadas roll-out of legalized pot.

That’s why the marijuana industry advises consumers “to start low and go slow,” Lake added. “See how you respond to the low dose and then go up gradually as you understand the effect it’s having on your body.”

Ontario Cannabis Store falsely labels genital spray as oral product

"Its a product like many that are used today for intimate areas of the body, but it should be labelled as such … obviously theres a mistake there that needs to be corrected, so we certainly will be following up with them to ensure that the right information is being given to consumers." (As of publication, the product description had not been corrected.)

Fleur de Lune Intimate Spray is shown in this photo posted on the Ontario Cannabis Store website.The only problem is that the Ontario Cannabis Store had initially mislabelled how to apply the product, saying it was for “sublingual” use, which means under the tongue — in other words, orally. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO – OCS.ca

Vic Fedeli Dodges Question About Intimate Cannabis Oil For Sale In Ontario

Asked Wednesday by reporters at the Ontario Legislature if the intimate spray is an appropriate product for the province to be selling, Finance Minister Vic Fedeli would only say: "Well leave it to the … Ontario Cannabis Store to continue to put products out there that the people of Ontario are looking forward to purchasing."

Asked Wednesday by reporters at the Ontario Legislature about the appropriateness of the spray, Finance Minister Vic Fedeli would only say: "Well leave it to the … Ontario Cannabis Store to continue to put products out there that the people of Ontario are looking forward to purchasing."

The 30-millilitre bottle of Fleur de Lune Intimate Spray, which has been approved by Health Canada, sells online for $82.95 and yields about 300 shots of mist.

"Its a product like many that are used today for intimate areas of the body, but it should be labelled as such … obviously theres a mistake there that needs to be corrected, so we certainly will be following up with them to ensure that the right information is being given to consumers."

"The thing about cannabis is that one of the largest areas of concentrations of cannabinoid receptors in the body is in fact the skin," Lake said Wednesday from Gatineau, Que.

The product description was corrected by the Ontario Cannabis Store after The Canadian Press reached out for comment. But a spokesperson for the store did not respond to questions about how the error happened, or whether the spray is an appropriate product for the province to be selling.

How much of the spray a consumer should use at a given time is an individual decision, he said, "because when it comes to cannabis "everyone is different."

"So there is no one dose thats right for any one particular person … Everybody responds to cannabis in a different way, and it may be because genetically you respond differently. It may be because you havent used cannabis before, so you have a different tolerance level."

Thats why the marijuana industry advises consumers "to start low and go slow," Lake added. "See how you respond to the low dose and then go up gradually as you understand the effect its having on your body."

“It’s a product like many that are used today for intimate areas of the body, but it should be labelled as such … obviously there’s a mistake there that needs to be corrected, so we certainly will be following up with them to ensure that the right information is being given to consumers.” (As of publication, the product description had not been corrected.)

However, one critical aspect to note is that the cannabis-based spray is made with MCT (medium chain triglyceride) oil, which reacts chemically with latex — the substance from which most condoms are made.

As condoms are used to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, "you would have to be very careful," suggested Lake.

A perusal of the Ontario Cannabis Stores online portal on the first day of legalization turned up an array of expected products – various strains of dried weed, oils and tinctures, and accessories needed to use them.

But also on offer is a cannabis-infused intimate spray, marketed under the enticingly named Fleur de Lune, which contains eight milligrams of the psychoactive ingredient THC, as well as the cannabinoid CBD.

The provinces new online store went live at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday as cannabis was legalized. For $82.95, plus shipping, Ontarians can order “Fleur de Lune Intimate Spray.” Its described as an “easy-to-use THC-infused oil for intimate use.”

The only problem is that the Ontario Cannabis Store had initially mislabelled how to apply the product, saying it was for sublingual use, which means under the tongue – in other words, orally.

His Progressive Conservative government is expected to pass its cannabis law, Bill 36, on Wednesday afternoon. That law will let residents smoke weed anywhere they smoke cigarettes, except in moving vehicles and boats.

In fact, the spray made by Hexo Corp. is meant to be applied on the genitals, particularly for women, to reduce such symptoms as inflammation and pain, said Terry Lake, the Quebec-based companys vice-president of corporate social responsibility.

“Vic! Vic! Vic!” a reporter shouted over everybody else. “The OCS is selling a product thats called Cannabis Intimate Spray. Is that an appropriate product to be selling on the website?”

We always knew there was going to be bumps along the road, no country has done this to this extent, Lake said of Canadas rollout of legalized pot.

Reporters at Queens Park muffled their laughter on Wednesday after the provinces finance minister was asked about an “intimate” product available through the Ontario Cannabis Store.

Its a product like many that are used today for intimate areas of the body, but it should be labelled as such … obviously theres a mistake there that needs to be corrected, so we certainly will be following up with them to ensure that the right information is being given to consumers.

“Well,” Minister Vic Fedeli said. “Well leave it to the Ontario Cannabis Store to continue to put products out there that the people of Ontario are looking for.”

The product description was corrected by the Ontario Cannabis Store after The Canadian Press reached out for comment. But a spokesperson for the store did not respond to questions about how the error happened, or whether the spray is an appropriate product for the province to be selling.

The legislation loosens regulations established by the previous Liberal regime, allowing Ontario residents to smoke recreational cannabis wherever tobacco-smoking is permitted.

Asked Wednesday by reporters at the Ontario Legislature about the appropriateness of the spray, Finance Minister Vic Fedeli would only say: Well leave it to the Ontario Cannabis Store to continue to put products out there that the people of Ontario are looking forward to purchasing.

For now, cannabis can only be purchased through the government-run online portal, and private retail pot stores are set to open in the province in April.

The 30-millilitre bottle of Fleur de Lune Intimate Spray, which has been approved by Health Canada, sells online for $82.95 and yields about 300 shots of mist.

The thing about cannabis is that one of the largest areas of concentrations of cannabinoid receptors in the body is in fact the skin, Lake said Wednesday from Gatineau, Que.

Ontario has passed its cannabis legislation, firmly establishing the right to smoke marijuana in public in the province.

How much of the spray a consumer should use at a given time is an individual decision, he said, because when it comes to cannabis everyone is different.

There are over 100 different communities,” she says. “Weve had meetings with representatives of Indigenous communities and we are working with the Ministry of Finance, the Minister of Indigenous Affairs as well, to make sure that we are responding to their individual communities’ concerns.”

So there is no one dose thats right for any one particular person … Everybody responds to cannabis in a different way, and it may be because genetically you respond differently. It may be because you havent used cannabis before, so you have a different tolerance level.

I would argue they have an economic right to interact with the cannabis plant. I think that is a profound argument. It is certainly very connected with arguments about self-governance, and I think that Ottawa and Ontario need to be cognizant of that and recognize whats happening there and see it as a good thing.

Thats why the marijuana industry advises consumers to start low and go slow, Lake added. See how you respond to the low dose and then go up gradually as you understand the effect its having on your body.

Barnhart is president of The National Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association, or NIMCA, a non-profit established in 2017 to defend the rights of Indigenous people involved in the cannabis industry. It’s an organization says Barnhart that can provide a template for self-regulation.

However, one critical aspect to note is that the cannabis-based spray is made with MCT (medium chain triglyceride) oil, which reacts chemically with latex – the substance from which most condoms are made.

In an interview with Global News, Ontario’s Attorney General Caroline Mulroney said that unlicensed dispensaries and production facilities are illegal. “The only legal seller of recreational marijuana in the province of Ontario will be the OCS on October 17th.”

As condoms are used to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, you would have to be very careful, suggested Lake.

Toronto cannabis lawyer Jack Lloyd has concerns. Its a complete grey area and it’s uncertain how its going to be regulated in their territories. It’s part of a broader argument about self-government and self-determination for those communities.

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Posted in Ontario